Archive for January, 2013

Mini Books for Micro Journaling

January 19, 2013

Generally when I write I prefer the broad canvas of an 8 ½ by 11 inch unlined page. You can write, draw, or paste in photos or clippings. But I find the tiny, “mini journals” irresistibly attractive. While my regular journals are inclusive of all aspects of my life, these mini journals each represent a single microcosm.

The notebook with the marbled cover is a gratitude book. As a discipline, I tried to write one thing each day that I was grateful for or admired, one thing that brought joy into my life or that I thought was beautiful.

The red book with the ladybug on the cover has been the start of expressing one “haiku” thought on each page, an attempt to learn to say more with fewer words.

The gorgeous bejeweled book in the center is the book I chose to record the charming things said by my three year old granddaughter. I will do another book for the other granddaughter as she begins to talk.

These mini books are the purest joy to re-read because they filter out the negative. They sit on the table beside my bed. After a difficult day it is uplifting to remind myself of all that is good in my life.

I have started giving mini blank books as presents in the hope that others will be encouraged to use them for similar purposes. I do have other tiny notebooks I use to record things like houseplant and garden notes and the work I do in the bee yard. That notebook is covered in propolis (bee glue) and I must write with a pencil.

When purchasing these mini books, never buy one that has pages that are bound in with glue.   Look for books that are sewn in or all of your pages will fall out over time. That goes for regular journal books, too.

It is interesting that many of the antique diaries I have seen, including my great-grandmother’s and great-great-grandmother’s, were so small that the space for each entry could hardly contain one sentence. Just one sentence can still convey a lot. If you don’t believe me, read haiku poetry.
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Journal as Novel, Part II- Recording and Reflecting on Your Life Story

January 15, 2013

Just read an interesting post from Bob Leckridge on his Word Press blog, “Heroes Not Zombies,”  titled “Plots and Fate” :

Plots and Fate

January 13, 2013 by bobleckridge

“Each of us lives out a story, a dynamic narrative whose only consistency is that we somehow show up in each of the scenes. While the plots line may be unknown to us, there is one.” Creating a Life. James Hollis

“We know ourselves and others through the stories we tell. We create meaning and gain an understanding of the events and experiences of our lives by creating a narrative. And isn’t that quote so true? Doesn’t it sometimes seem as if the only constant in our life story is that we show up in each of the scenes. All of life, the world we live in and experience, is woven into these stories, which always, in some way, contain ourselves.”

I suggest you read the entire blog and see the connections with journaling.  I looked up Creating a Life by James Hollis and that also seems an appropriate reference for those who are recording their life story in diaries.    It appears to have received five star reviews on Goodreads.

 

The Journal as Novel

January 12, 2013

Is a diarist a “writer”?  Can we say we have written many “books”?  (Don’t they look like books?) If life is story, then are you a novelist?  Possibly a novelist of tedious prose, with far too many details, a novelist in need of an editor?    When you have written about your life for nearly fifty years, as I have, it becomes a sort of opus perpetualis, a never-ending novel, although it will, of course, come to an end some day, and that’s called the denouement.

 

I enjoy reflecting on the similarities and differences between diaries and novels.  The truth in a diary might be stranger than the fiction in a novel.  The protagonist of the diary lives in the ongoing present moment yet possesses the ability to transgress time – relive the past and imagine the future.  A future reader might know the last chapter of the story, even as the diary writer can look back in time and know the outcome of all the choices of his/her past.

 

Although a diary certainly lacks the cohesiveness of a novel, I agree with Patricia and Robert Malcolmson, editors of Nella Last in the 1950s, that “The unifying force in a diary is usually the mind of the diarist …”

 

All the elements of a novel are present in a diary:

The protagonist – complete with flaws (some tragic)

The main characters – family, friends, pets, allies or enemies

Minor characters – side-kicks, cameo appearances, angels and helpers, imaginary friends, antagonists and villains

Plots and subplots – challenges, entanglements, misunderstandings, conflicts, spicy sexual liaisons or tepid dalliances, insights and changes, and possibly the evolving of the protagonist

Settings – what an amazing variety in an average life!

Action and adventure

 

Depending on the unique tapestry of your writing you will either be a fascinating read in one hundred years or mundane and boring.  Who knows?  Who cares?  I write my journal for myself and seldom think about how shallow it might be.  I suppose I should care but I wish neither to entertain or enlighten anyone but myself.

 

My continuous novel looks like this:

Protagonist:  me

Strengths: perseverance, mellow personality, even–tempered, honesty, reliability, courage, knowledge in     certain areas, relative lack of prejudices

Flaws: indecisiveness, slowness to anger or take action, inability to play social politics, tendency to be too diplomatic, lack of energy

Weapons: the pen, determination

Stumbling blocks: often misjudged, seen as a threat, wrongly accused

 

Main characters:  family, friends, pets, boyfriends, husbands, acquaintances, bookstore customers

Various settings:  five states, cities and rural towns, a ranch, a farm, a cottage, bookstores, travels

Antagonists: sometimes those I love – family, friends, boyfriends; renters, technology, machines, weather, predators, Fate, Time, lack of money, cancer

Theme – good question

 

Plot – the protagonist attempts to:

1.  make enough money to live on in a variety of jobs (day care, landscaping, pet sitting, bookdealer)

2. create a wonderful, community-oriented, thriving bookstore

3.  love and support family

4.  grow organic vegetables and beautiful gardens

5.  maintain prosperous honeybees

6.  live a totally conscious life with awareness of and respect for nature and the environment

7.  participate in activities that will encourage community

8.  create a National Diary Archive

 

That’s the outline of my never-ending novel, a best seller for sure.   Comments?  You may email me at bluemoon47@qwestoffice.net

National Diary Archive Update: January 2013

January 6, 2013

The New Year has begun and I am returning to my work on the National Diary Archive which was interrupted by the intense labor of moving and then re-creating my used, out-of-print and rare bookstore, The Eclectic Reader, in Fort Collins, Colorado. In September of 2011 we moved 12,000 books and their bookcases and miscellaneous store furniture into a retail location close to home. It was an amazing transformation from a blank canvas to:”voila!” – a used bookstore. Although it took more than seven days, I am pleased.

You may visit The Eclectic Reader on Facebook.

So this will be the year of setting up the archive. If no one shows up to help, I will do it myself, “begin it now.” My philosophy on this is summed up in this quote cobbled together from various sources, (but definitely not Goethe):

“The moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decisions, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings and material assistance which no man could have dreamed would have come his way. Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. Begin it now.”

I am planning to have a website and a non-profit status by the end of 2013. I do not anticipate being so lucky as to have a physical building for the archive unless it’s free. Donations will be temporarily archived either in my garage (where the bookstore used to be) or within the current bookstore.

To start the year off with a bounce, I will be teaching a journal writing workshop on January 20th, from 1-3 p.m. here at The Eclectic Reader followed by a free social gathering for journal writers and a discussion on the creation of the National Diary Archive.

Contact Cynthia Manuel at The Eclectic Reader at 970-493-7933 or bluemoon47@qwestoffice.net


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